The Timber Shed

In August 1786 the Dutch East India Company decreed erection of the Timber Shed for storage of timber prior to shipment by sea. The contract went to local settler Jan Jakob Jerling (some of whose descendants still live in Plett).  The first timber was shipped out in August 1788; but the project had limited success and failed to survive the colony’s First British Occupation in 1795. The Timber Shed was declared a national monument in 1936.

 

The Timber Shed

Construction of the Timber Shed was commissioned by the Dutch East India Company in or about 1786 in order to store cut timber prior to shipment by sea. The construction contract was awarded to a number of local residents, notably Johann (Jan Jacob) Jerling, the South African family’s stamvader. Timber was shipped out of Plettenberg Bay for the first time in August 1788, but all such shipments had ceased by the end of the 18th Century. On 1 September 1936, the Timber Shed was declared a National Monument. Although partially restored some time ago, the shed has fallen once more into disrepair. [Directions to get there and picture]